Author ORCID Identifier

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8713-5378

Document Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2022

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

S Jean Caraway

Abstract

Research involving sexual violence among individuals with disabilities is scarce despite a prevalence rate higher than the general population. The perspectives of care providers regarding their experience working with individuals with disabilities who have experienced sexual violence is even less understood. The purpose of the current grounded theory study was to better understand the experience of care providers working with individuals with disabilities who have experienced sexual violence. Care providers of individuals with disabilities were recruited from disability services agencies and interviewed by the primary researcher. There were ten participants from a variety of direct care, ancillary care, and administrative positions. A grounded theory approach was used to data collection and interpretation to develop a working theory as to the process care providers go through when working with individuals with disabilities who have experienced sexual violence. From ten verbatim transcripts, codes were developed and placed into four related categories: factors leading to sexual violence, affirming experiences, negative experiences, and necessary changes. Additionally, participants provided insight into trauma-informed interviewing practices for future research with individuals with disabilities who have experienced sexual violence. Results from the study added the perspective of care providers working with individuals with disabilities to the existing body of literature. It is important for agencies who employ care providers and the general public to be aware of the process care providers encounter when working with sexual violence in the disability services sector.

Subject Categories

Psychology

Keywords

sexual violence, disabilities

Number of Pages

85

Publisher

University of South Dakota

Included in

Psychology Commons

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